Fatty Acids Profiles of Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens) in Lakes of the Outaouais Region with and without Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides) and Smallmouth Bass (Micropterus dolomieu)

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Title: Fatty Acids Profiles of Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens) in Lakes of the Outaouais Region with and without Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides) and Smallmouth Bass (Micropterus dolomieu)
Authors: Langevin, Karolanne
Date: 2016
Abstract: Fatty acids (FAs) are used as trophic markers in aquatic food web studies, but few studies have quantified individual variability in FAs profiles over several sites in a range of conditions. I investigated whether FAs profiles of yellow perch (YP), Perca flavescens, vary with body size and between lakes with and without largemouth (Micropterus salmoides), and smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), the most common and abundant piscivores in lakes of the region. I analyzed the FAs of YP as well as zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, and prey fish collected from eight lakes where bass were either present or absent in the Outaouais region over the summer of 2016. I compared the growth rate of YP between the lakes and the YP in lakes without bass exhibited a slower growth rate. I also compared the FA signatures of YP using redundancy analysis (RDA). 23 FAs could be identified and quantified. FAs profiles were dominated by palmitic- (16:0), oleic- (18:1), stearic- (18:0), and palmitoleic acid (16:1). The RDA analysis based on FAs profiles of YP revealed variation along two main gradients (the presence of bass and the date of capture). The first two eigenvectors accounted for 42.1% of the variation (RDA1=27.6% and 2=14.6%). Arachidonic (20:4) and docosatrienoic (22:3) were the most correlated FAs with RDA1. Due to the sampling period, it was impossible to determine if the observed effects were due to the date of capture, the presence of bass, or a change in metabolism, but the last two were deemed as the most plausible explanations. It was concluded that the utility of FA signatures to quantify diet in natural environments is limited and that FAs might be more successful as markers in primary consumers and other lower trophic levels. It is recommended that a combination of FAs, stable isotopes, and modelling should be used in the future.
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/35366
http://dx.doi.org/10.20381/ruor-324
CollectionThèses, 2011 - // Theses, 2011 -
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