Acculturation, Discrimination and Religiosity as Predictors of Sexual Experience and Sexual Knowledge among Haitian-Canadian, Franco-Ontarian and Anglo-Canadian Emerging Adults

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Title: Acculturation, Discrimination and Religiosity as Predictors of Sexual Experience and Sexual Knowledge among Haitian-Canadian, Franco-Ontarian and Anglo-Canadian Emerging Adults
Authors: Olavarria Turner, Marcela
Date: 2014
Abstract: Sexual health is related to sexual experience and the accurate understanding of HIV and STIs modes of transmission, symptoms, and prevention. An examination of the influence of sociocultural factors provides a greater understanding of the determinants of sexual health given that sexual conduct is socially and culturally constructed. Consequently, this study sought to examine the influence of acculturation as it related to identity, behaviours and values, and the effects of religiosity and perceived discrimination in Haitian-Canadian, Franco-Ontarian and Anglo-Canadian emerging adults on their level of sexual experience and knowledge of HIV and STIs. The results indicated that Haitian-Canadians were the least sexually experienced group. Haitian-Canadian women in particular, were less experienced than Franco-Ontarian and Anglo-Canadian young women. The three groups did not differ in their level of knowledge regarding HIV. Yet, Anglo-Canadians were the most knowledgeable regarding STIs, followed by Franco-Ontarians. The level of religiosity experienced by participants was the only significant predictor related to sexual experience for all three groups. More religiosity predicted less sexual experience. Furthermore, greater religiosity also predicted less knowledge of HIV for Franco-Ontarians. These findings suggest that more specific measures regarding sexual norms and values should be used to examine sexual acculturation.
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/31464
http://dx.doi.org/10.20381/ruor-6513
CollectionThèses, 2011 - // Theses, 2011 -
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