Control of Uncoupling Protein-1 (UCP1) by Phosphorylation and the Metabolic Impact of Ectopic UCP1 Expression in Skeletal Muscle of Mice

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Title: Control of Uncoupling Protein-1 (UCP1) by Phosphorylation and the Metabolic Impact of Ectopic UCP1 Expression in Skeletal Muscle of Mice
Authors: Adjeitey, Cyril
Date: 2013
Abstract: UCP1 is a member of the mitochondrial transmembrane anion carrier protein superfamily and is required to mediate adaptive thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT). Once activated, UCP1 uncouples mitochondrial respiration from ATP synthesis, thereby wasting the protonmotive force formed across the mitochondrial inner membrane as heat. It is hypothesized that proton leaks through UCP1 could be a molecular target to combat certain forms of obesity. Although it is well established that UCP1 is regulated by allosteric mechanisms, alternative methods such as post-translational modification still remain to be explored. The aims of the present study were to confirm the phosphorylation of UCP1 and the physiological relevance of this modification. Using isoelectric focusing, we confirmed that UCP1 displayed acidic shifts consistent with phosphorylation in BAT mitochondria isolated from cold exposed versus warm acclimated mice. A mouse model that ectopically expressed UCP1 in skeletal muscle was used to explore the link between the mitochondrial redox status and UCP1 function. Our results show that the expression of UCP1 in skeletal muscle led to decreases in body and tissues weights. In contrast, glucose uptake into skeletal muscle, food intake and energy expenditure was increased with the expression of UCP1. Finally, proton leaks through UCP1 were determined to be increased in isolated mitochondria from transgenic versus wild-type mice. Taken together these results indicate a complex interplay between mitochondrial redox status, post-translational modification and UCP1 function. Elucidation of novel mechanisms regulating UCP1 offers alternatives strategies that can be explored in order to modulate BAT thermogenesis.
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/24231
http://dx.doi.org/10.20381/ruor-3031
CollectionThèses, 2011 - // Theses, 2011 -
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