Key Concepts and Rationalities in Canada's Environmental Enforcement Act: Tensions between Environmental Protection and Economic Development

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Title: Key Concepts and Rationalities in Canada's Environmental Enforcement Act: Tensions between Environmental Protection and Economic Development
Authors: Doyle, Jessica J.
Date: 2012
Abstract: This thesis first describes and analyzes the key concepts and rationalities that are dominant in the content of the Environmental Enforcement Act (EEA). The research project concludes that despite legislative shifts towards increased punishment and deterrence, key concepts and rationalities such as the importance of economic globalization, the continuation of risk-management and anthropocentric values, and the dominance of staples development can be observed in the content of the EEA. The EEA also reflects growing concerns towards managing known structural economic problems such as Canada’s staples development and economic globalization. Secondly, this thesis critically evaluates whether the EEA is likely to contribute towards the effectiveness of Canadian environmental governance strategies. The EEA is likely to be ineffective based on observations of structural challenges in environmental governance and the Canadian political economic context. Neoliberalism, economic globalization, risk management, anthropocentrism, and staples based economic development characterize the problems identified in existing research that the content of the EEA does not adequately address.
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/22813
http://dx.doi.org/10.20381/ruor-5678
CollectionThèses, 2011 - // Theses, 2011 -
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