Blood Microflow Characterization Using Micro-Particle Image Velocimetry and 2-Beam Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy

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Title: Blood Microflow Characterization Using Micro-Particle Image Velocimetry and 2-Beam Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy
Authors: Le, Andy Vinh
Date: 2020-12-04
Abstract: Blood flow through microcirculation in both simple and complex geometry has been difficult to predict due to the composition and complex behavior of blood at the microscale. Blood is a dense suspension of deformable red blood cells that is comparable in dimensions to the microchannels that it flows through. As a result, rheological properties at the microscale can vastly differ from bulk rheological properties due to non-continuum effects. To further develop our understanding of blood microflow; experimental techniques should be explored. In this work, we explore micro-particle image velocimetry (μPIV) and two-beam fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (2bFCCS) in the application of characterizing blood in microflow conditions. For the development of the μPIV analysis, a polydimethylsiloxane co-flow channel is used to observe blood flow in controlled conditions. Flow conditions (velocity profile and blood layer thickness) are selected based on an analytical model and compared to experimental measurement. The experimental results presented indicate that current flow conditions are inadequate in providing a controlled rate of shear on the blood layer in the co-flow channel and further optimization are required to improve the measurement of the velocity profile. For the development of the 2bFCCS application for blood flow analysis, a wide glass capillary microfluidic device is used to complete the verification of fluorescence fluid admissibility, the effect of laser intensity on inducing photobleaching and the velocity measurement performance. The experimental measurement of the velocity profile is validated against the theoretical profile for a rectangular channel. Results of the velocity profile of high concentration red blood cells show promise in the technique’s ability to measure blood microflows closer to physiological conditions.
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/41535
http://dx.doi.org/10.20381/ruor-25759
CollectionThèses, 2011 - // Theses, 2011 -
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