Determining the Contribution of Utrophin A Versus Other Components of the Slow, Oxidative Phenotype in the Beneficial Adaptations of Dystrophic Muscle Fibers Following AMPK Activation

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Title: Determining the Contribution of Utrophin A Versus Other Components of the Slow, Oxidative Phenotype in the Beneficial Adaptations of Dystrophic Muscle Fibers Following AMPK Activation
Authors: Al-Rewashdy, Hasanen
Date: 2014
Abstract: Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) results from the absence of a functional dystrophin protein. Among its possible therapeutic options is the upregulation of dystrophin’s autosomal analogue, utrophin A. This can be achieved by a pharmacologically induced shift towards a slower, more oxidative skeletal muscle phenotype, which has been shown to confer morphological and functional improvements on models of DMD. Whether these improvements are a result of the utrophin A upregulation or other beneficial adaptations associated with the slow, oxidative phenotype, such as improved autophagy, has not been determined. To understand the importance of utrophin A to the therapeutic value of the slow, oxidative phenotype, we used the utrophin/dystrophin double knockout (dKO) model of DMD. We found the dKO mouse to have a similar skeletal muscle signaling capacity and phenotype to mdx mice. When treated with the adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) agonist 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR), both dKO and mdx mice expressed a shift towards a slower, more oxidative phenotype. In the mdx mice, this shift caused improvements in muscle fiber central nucleation, IgM penetration, damage from eccentric contractions, and forelimb grip strength. These morphological and functional benefits were not seen in the AICAR treated dKO mice. This study highlights the importance of utrophin A upregulation to the benefits of the slow, oxidative myogenic program to dystrophic mice. It confirms utrophin A as a therapeutic target in DMD and the slow, oxidative myogenic program as clinically relevant avenue towards treatment of the disease.
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/31470
http://dx.doi.org/10.20381/ruor-6527
CollectionThèses, 2011 - // Theses, 2011 -
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