Metacognitive knowledge and skilled sport performance.

Description
Title: Metacognitive knowledge and skilled sport performance.
Authors: Toward, Jeffrey Ian.
Date: 1996
Abstract: This investigation sought to examine expert-novice differences in metacognitive knowledge about action and metacognitive skill functioning, as they relate to the performance of the basketball foul shot. Twenty-four female undergraduate students served as subjects in this investigation. Twelve of the 24 subjects were classified as basketball experts (Group one) and 12 as basketball novices (Group two). Classification as either an expert or novice was dependent upon the total number of seasons having played competitive basketball. Both groups of subjects performed three tasks, each designed to assess a different aspect of their metacognitive functioning. Task one sought to identify group differences in the declarative component of metacognitive knowledge about action through the collection and comparison of instructional verbal protocols. Task two sought to identify both between group differences and the within group relationship between one's actions and the corresponding verbal description of those actions through the collection and comparison of verbal and visual protocols. It was believed that such a comparison would serve to identify group differences in the procedural component of metacognitive knowledge about action. Finally, Task three sought to identify group differences in metacognitive skill functioning as determined through each subject's ability to monitor her performance, predict performance outcomes, and explain the predictions made. When combined, the results obtained at these three tasks suggested that, specific to performance of the basketball foul shot, the level of metacognitive knowledge about action and metacognitive skill possessed by the subject within this investigation was a function of their level of expertise. The 'expert' subjects within Group one were seen to provide complete and accurate instruction in the proper execution of a basketball foul shot. Their ability to accurately describe the actions produced at Task two indicated that they possessed higher levels of the procedural component of metacognitive knowledge about action when compared to Group two subjects. Group one subjects were seen to make significantly more fouls hosts than Group two subjects at Task three and were also significantly better than Group two subjects with respect to their ability to monitor and successfully predict their performance outcomes. The results obtained at this investigation served to highlight the important, yet often overlooked, association between action and cognition.
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/9751
http://dx.doi.org/10.20381/ruor-7950
CollectionTh├Ęses, 1910 - 2010 // Theses, 1910 - 2010
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