Work-related factors predict changes in physical activity among nurses participating in a web-based worksite intervention: a randomized controlled trial

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Title: Work-related factors predict changes in physical activity among nurses participating in a web-based worksite intervention: a randomized controlled trial
Authors: Brunet, Jennifer
Black, Melissa M
Tulloch, Heather E
Pipe, Andrew L
Reid, Robert D
Reed, Jennifer L
Date: 2021
Abstract: Background: Despite the numerous benefits associated with physical activity (PA), most nurses are not active enough and few interventions have been developed to promote PA among nurses. A secondary analysis of raw data from a single-centre, three-arm parallel-group randomized controlled trial was conducted to assess whether work-related characteristics and general mood states predict changes in total weekly moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA) and average daily step-count among nurses participating in a 6-week web-based worksite intervention. Methods: Seventy nurses (meanage: 46.1 ± 11.2 years) were randomized to an individual-, friend-, or team-based PA challenge. Participants completed questionnaires pre- and post-intervention assessing work-related characteristics (i.e., shift schedule and length, number of hours worked per week, work role) and general mood states (i.e., tension, depression, anger, confusion, fatigue, vigour). Participants received a PA monitor to wear before and during the 6-week PA challenge, which was used to assess total weekly MVPA minutes and average daily step-count. Data were analyzed descriptively and using multilevel modeling for repeated measures. Results: Change in total weekly MVPA minutes, but not change in average daily step-count, was predicted by shift schedule (rotating vs. fixed) by time (estimate = − 17.43, SE = 6.18, p = .006), and work role (clinical-only vs. other) by time (estimate = 18.98, SE = 6.51, p = .005). General mood states did not predict change in MVPA or change in average daily step-count. Conclusions: Given that nurses who work rotating shifts and perform clinical work showed smaller improvements in MVPA, it may be necessary to consider work-related factors/barriers (e.g., time constraints, fatigue) and collaborate with nurses when designing and implementing MVPA interventions in the workplace.
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/44002
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12912-021-00739-4
CollectionSciences de la santé - Publications // Health Sciences - Publications
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