Evaluating Subjective Cognitive Decline as a Predictor of Objective Cognitive Performance in Monolingual and Bilingual Older Adults: A Comparison between Groups

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Title: Evaluating Subjective Cognitive Decline as a Predictor of Objective Cognitive Performance in Monolingual and Bilingual Older Adults: A Comparison between Groups
Authors: Robinson , Nathalie
Date: 2021-11-18
Abstract: To evaluate subjective cognitive decline (SCD) as a predictor of objective cognitive performance in monolingual and bilingual older adults and to examine differences in SCD and objective performance between both samples. It is hypothesized that bilinguals will show stronger performance on executive function tasks, episodic memory tasks and weaker performance on language tasks, while also displaying lower levels of SCD, relative to monolinguals. Participants consisted of older adults, aged 65 years and older, fluent in both English and French. Bilingualism was measured using a 5-point Likert scale (1=no ability and 5=native likeability) to measure language proficiency. SCD was measured using 3 yes/no questions assessing concentration, memory problems and word-finding difficulties. Objective performance was assessed in areas of executive function, working memory, episodic memory and language using tasks: The Stroop task, BNT, CVLT II and the LNS task. Two independent sample t-tests were used to examine differences in SCD and objective performance in both samples and several linear regressions analyses were conducted separately for both the monolingual and bilingual sample to evaluate SCD as a predictor of objective performance. In the bilingual sample, SCD in language demonstrated to predict objective performance on the CVLT II task. In the monolingual sample, SCD in memory and language demonstrated to predict objective performance on the LNS task. These findings suggest there are significant differences in objective performance between both samples and that SCD is a predictor of objective performance in both bilingual and monolingual samples, but further research would need to be conducted.
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/42932
http://dx.doi.org/10.20381/ruor-27149
CollectionThèses Saint-Paul // Saint Paul Theses
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