Asteraceae Pollen Provisions Protect Osmia Mason Bees (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) from Brood Parasitism

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dc.contributor.authorSpear, Dakota M
dc.contributor.authorSilverman, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorForrest, Jessica R K
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-06T13:47:58Z
dc.date.available2021-04-06T13:47:58Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0003-0147
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10393/41971
dc.description.abstractMany specialist herbivores eat foods that are apparently low quality. The compensatory benefits of a poor diet may include protection from natural enemies. Several bee lineages specialize on pollen of the plant family Asteraceae, which is known to be a poor-quality food. Here we tested the hypothesis that specialization on Asteraceae pollen protects bees from parasitism. We compared rates of brood parasitism by Sapyga wasps on Asteraceae-specialist, Fabeae-specialist, and other species of Osmia bees in the field over several years and sites and found that Asteraceae-specialist species were parasitized significantly less frequently than other species. We then tested the effect of Asteraceae pollen on parasites by raising Sapyga larvae on three pollen mixtures: Asteraceae, Fabeae, and generalist (a mix of primarily non-Asteraceae pollens). Survival of parasite larvae was significantly reduced on Asteraceae provisions. Our results suggest that specialization on low-quality pollen may evolve because it helps protect bees from natural enemies.
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectSapygidae
dc.subjectcleptoparasites
dc.subjectoligolecty
dc.subjectspecialization
dc.subjecttritrophic interactions
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectBees
dc.subjectDiet
dc.subjectFabaceae
dc.subjectLarva
dc.subjectWasps
dc.subjectAsteraceae
dc.subjectPollen
dc.titleAsteraceae Pollen Provisions Protect Osmia Mason Bees (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) from Brood Parasitism
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/686241
CollectionBiologie // Biology

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