The Social and Cultural Impacts of Reducing the Reliance on Diesel in Canada’s Northern Indigenous Communities

FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorCook, Rebecca
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-16T19:55:32Z
dc.date.available2020-09-16T19:55:32Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationCook, Rebecca L. “The Social and Cultural Impacts of Reducing the Reliance on Diesel in Canada’s Northern Indigenous Communities.” Confetti: A World Literatures and Cultures Journal / Un journal de littératures et cultures du monde, vol. 5, 2019, pp. 63-79, https://arts.uottawa.ca/modernlanguages/sites/arts.uottawa.ca.modernlanguages/files/confetti-volume-2019-version_finale.pdf.
dc.identifier.urihttps://arts.uottawa.ca/modernlanguages/sites/arts.uottawa.ca.modernlanguages/files/confetti-volume-2019-version_finale.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10393/41023
dc.description.abstractAs the Canadian government seeks to reconcile its relationship with the Indigenous Peoples of Canada, energy poverty in northern Indigenous communities must be addressed and resolved by the development of clean energy projects. Though the Canadian government has declared its intention to work alongside and assist these communities with the shift toward more sustainable methods for power, this paper highlights the necessity of following through on these initiatives. Relying on a qualitative secondary research approach, this study brings together various aspects into a holistic perspective to make a case for the imbrication of social and cultural factors as well as consequences to drive the argument of the need to reduce the reliance on diesel in northern Indigenous communities
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectindigenous
dc.subjectCanada
dc.subjectclean energy
dc.titleThe Social and Cultural Impacts of Reducing the Reliance on Diesel in Canada’s Northern Indigenous Communities
dc.typeArticle
CollectionConfetti - Un journal de littératures et cultures du monde // Confetti - A World Literatures and Cultures Journal

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