Colonial Trauma in Canada: Ethnostress, Public Stress and Political Stress among Indigenous Peoples

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dc.contributor.authorPilon, Marylene
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-15T20:13:23Z
dc.date.available2020-09-15T20:13:23Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationPilon, Marylene. “Colonial Trauma in Canada: Ethnostress, Public Stress and Political Stress among Indigenous Peoples.” Confetti: A World Literatures and Cultures Journal / Un journal de littératures et cultures du monde, vol. 6, 2020, https://arts.uottawa.ca/modernlanguages/sites/arts.uottawa.ca.modernlanguages/files/confetti_volume6_2020.pdf.
dc.identifier.urihttps://arts.uottawa.ca/modernlanguages/sites/arts.uottawa.ca.modernlanguages/files/confetti_volume6_2020.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10393/41004
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, through the application of the concepts of ethnostress, public stress and political stress to Indigenous communities in Canada, I demonstrate how modern pressures have repercussions where there remains lasting transgenerational colonization-trauma. From the background of the context and social significance of French and British colonization in Canada, this paper examines how the current political circumstances and popular discourse perpetuate an unhealthy environment for Indigenous communities that is harmful to reconciliation prospects and to ending the long shadow of a traumatic past, sometimes despite the best intentions.
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectethnostress
dc.subjectCanada
dc.subjectindigenous
dc.subjecttrauma
dc.titleColonial Trauma in Canada: Ethnostress, Public Stress and Political Stress among Indigenous Peoples
dc.typeArticle
CollectionConfetti - Un journal de littératures et cultures du monde // Confetti - A World Literatures and Cultures Journal

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