The Dichotomy of Puerto Rico: A Comparison of Rosario Ferré’s Maldito amor and Her Self-translation Sweet Diamond Dust

FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorRoche, Abigail
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-15T20:13:17Z
dc.date.available2020-09-15T20:13:17Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationRoche, Abigail. “The Dichotomy of Puerto Rico: A Comparison of Rosario Ferré’s Maldito amor and Her Self-translation Sweet Diamond Dust.” Confetti: A World Literatures and Cultures Journal / Un journal de littératures et cultures du monde, vol. 6, 2020, https://arts.uottawa.ca/modernlanguages/sites/arts.uottawa.ca.modernlanguages/files/confetti_volume6_2020.pdf.
dc.identifier.urihttps://arts.uottawa.ca/modernlanguages/sites/arts.uottawa.ca.modernlanguages/files/confetti_volume6_2020.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10393/41003
dc.description.abstractIn Rosario Ferré’s English self-translation of her novel Maldito amor, published as Sweet Diamond Dust, she significantly alters the content of the source text to fit an English-speaking readership. I describe and examine the dichotomous elements of Ferré’s Puerto Rican social identity—and, by extension, of the Puerto Rican collective identity—through an analysis of the disparities between the source text and her translation, against the context of the island’s cultural and political history as well as its colonial and neocolonial relationship with the United States.
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectRosario Ferré
dc.subjectidentity
dc.subjecttranslation
dc.titleThe Dichotomy of Puerto Rico: A Comparison of Rosario Ferré’s Maldito amor and Her Self-translation Sweet Diamond Dust
dc.typeArticle
CollectionConfetti - Un journal de littératures et cultures du monde // Confetti - A World Literatures and Cultures Journal

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