Middle Powers and Multilateralism in an Unstable Region – Canada’s Role in a Post-Arab Spring Middle East

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Title: Middle Powers and Multilateralism in an Unstable Region – Canada’s Role in a Post-Arab Spring Middle East
Authors: Renard, Nora
Date: 2020
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to assess and answer the question of, in a highly globalized world where the destabilizing effects of the regional security in the Middle East are felt internationally, should Canada, through multilateralism, employ its middle power status with others political actors of equal calibre, to support cooperation amongst the key Middle Eastern powers: Iran and Saudi Arabia? Following the Arab Spring of 2011, numerous Western nations voiced support and efforts for political reform in the region. Canada appeared to waver and maintained a blasé and reactive foreign policy stance, which could be misconstrued as Canada refusing a leadership role in historically significant events. The research and literature cited will evaluate how global events and alliances that began in the early 20th century and continued into the 21st set the trajectory for how Middle East actors would try to establish dominance at the expense of social progress, especially now, in the wake of the threat to liberal internationalism and the liberal order. The study addresses how regional instability can affect the whole region and spread as far as Canadian shores. This study will present its findings on Canada’s historic role in the region, its role as a middle power, and if working towards regional cooperation amongst historic rivals is a possible solution for the Middle East.
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/40672
CollectionDIM - Mémoires // IDGS - Research Papers
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