Social Capital and Having a Regular Family Doctor: Evidence from Longitudinal Data

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Title: Social Capital and Having a Regular Family Doctor: Evidence from Longitudinal Data
Authors: Bataineh, Hana
Devlin, Rose Anne
Barham, Vicky
Date: 2018
Abstract: Evidence shows that access to a regular family doctor increases the likelihood of regular care; but about 15% of the Canadian population does not have access to a regular family doctor. We are the first to examine if the presence of individual social capital (e.g., tangible support, friends and family) increases the likelihood of having a regular family doctor. Using the Canadian National Population Health longitudinal survey (1994 to 2010) and a dynamic random effects model (with and without endogenous initial conditions) we find robust evidence of a statistically significant and positive causal relationship between social capital and the probability of having a regular family doctor. Since past access to a family doctor is a strong predictor of both current and future access, we show that social capital is much more important in helping individuals find a family doctor than for keeping one.
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/40327
CollectionÉconomie - Publications // Economics - Working Papers
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