Smartphones in mental health: a critical review of background issues, current status and future concerns

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dc.contributor.authorBauer, Michael
dc.contributor.authorGlenn, Tasha
dc.contributor.authorGeddes, John
dc.contributor.authorGitlin, Michael
dc.contributor.authorGrof, Paul
dc.contributor.authorKessing, Lars V
dc.contributor.authorMonteith, Scott
dc.contributor.authorFaurholt-Jepsen, Maria
dc.contributor.authorSeverus, Emanuel
dc.contributor.authorWhybrow, Peter C
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-12T04:46:51Z
dc.date.available2020-01-12T04:46:51Z
dc.date.issued2020-01-10
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Bipolar Disorders. 2020 Jan 10;8(1):2
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s40345-019-0164-x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10393/40061
dc.description.abstractAbstract There has been increasing interest in the use of smartphone applications (apps) and other consumer technology in mental health care for a number of years. However, the vision of data from apps seamlessly returned to, and integrated in, the electronic medical record (EMR) to assist both psychiatrists and patients has not been widely achieved, due in part to complex issues involved in the use of smartphone and other consumer technology in psychiatry. These issues include consumer technology usage, clinical utility, commercialization, and evolving consumer technology. Technological, legal and commercial issues, as well as medical issues, will determine the role of consumer technology in psychiatry. Recommendations for a more productive direction for the use of consumer technology in psychiatry are provided.
dc.titleSmartphones in mental health: a critical review of background issues, current status and future concerns
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.date.updated2020-01-12T04:46:51Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.rights.holderThe Author(s)
CollectionLibre accès - Publications // Open Access - Publications

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