Exploration of English Language Program Undergraduate Nursing Students’ Attitudes Toward the Risks of English-French Language Discordance and Their Implementation of the Active Offer of French Language Health Services in Ontario

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Title: Exploration of English Language Program Undergraduate Nursing Students’ Attitudes Toward the Risks of English-French Language Discordance and Their Implementation of the Active Offer of French Language Health Services in Ontario
Authors: Ford, Amy
Date: 2018-04-25
Abstract: As has been reported in Canadian research on the experiences of Francophone patients and Francophone health professionals, active offer is not common or well performed in the Ontario healthcare system (Bernier, 2009; Boileau, 2016; Bouchard & Desmeules, 2013; Drolet et al., 2014; Hien & Lafontant, 2013). This descriptive quantitative research explored the self-reported awareness and implementation of the active offer concept during clinical placements by English language program 4th year undergraduate nursing students. A total of 69 participants were recruited in April 2017 to complete a paper or online-based survey. The survey consisted of questions on French language abilities, awareness of the patient safety risk of language discordance, communication experiences with Francophone patients and opinions of the role of the nurse, healthcare organizations and universities in the implementation of active offer. The participating nursing students reported little knowledge and training for implementing active offer during clinical settings. Despite the lack of preparation, the majority of them (92%) reported caring for a Francophone patient at least once with 25% doing that eight times or more during their clinical placements. More than 84% reported finding a way to communicate with Francophone patients in French, by speaking to them in French themselves or by asking Francophone colleagues, a professional interpreter or the patients’ family to interpret for them. Study recommendations include training nursing students during their undergraduate studies about the patient safety risks of language discordance, active offer and how to implement it. All English program nursing students should also be taught how to access and work with a professional interpreter. Those with French language skills should be encouraged to take healthcare specific language training. New research should be done to explore communication between English language program nursing students and Francophone patients to identify if it is safe and adequate from both the student and the patient’s point of view.
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/37552
http://dx.doi.org/10.20381/ruor-21821
CollectionThèses, 2011 - // Theses, 2011 -
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