Pre-Clinical Assessment of the Proteasomal Inhibitor Bortezomib as a Generalized Therapeutic Approach for Recessively Inherited Disorders

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Title: Pre-Clinical Assessment of the Proteasomal Inhibitor Bortezomib as a Generalized Therapeutic Approach for Recessively Inherited Disorders
Authors: Jary, Calvin
Date: 2017
Abstract: The number of known monogenic rare diseases (~7000) exceeds the number of effective treatments (~500) by more than an order of magnitude underlining the pressing need for generalizable therapeutic approaches for this class of conditions. In this regard, the majority of recessive and x-linked recessive disorders are caused by missense mutations encoding proteins that frequently have residual function but are rapidly degraded by the 26S proteasome. Bortezomib is a small molecule that inhibits the 26S proteasome and has been approved for use in patients for an unrelated condition; multiple myeloma. Previous work has shown that, for a small number of disorders, bortezomib can inhibit the degradation of the mutant protein, thereby increasing the protein level and activity, holding out the promise of a beneficial therapeutic effect by the repurposing of this agent. We present here a high level western blot based survey of nine recessive disorders to characterize the general effectiveness of such an approach. Thirteen patient fibroblast cell lines comprising 9 different diseases with 19 known mutations were selected on the basis of missense mutations protein expression data when available. The cell lines were incubated with bortezomib (10 nM and 50 nM; 24 hrs) and levels of the mutated protein were quantified by western blot. Unfortunately, no consistent, appreciable increase was observed for any of the conditions tested. The general therapeutic value of re-purposing bortezomib for recessive and x-linked diseases appears limited at best. The few reported cases of bortezomib successfully working in increasing mutated protein levels appear to be the exceptions and not the norm. Moreover successes are more often limited to cell lines carrying a transgene expressing the mutated protein rather than endogenous mutated protein in patient cell lines.
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/36066
http://dx.doi.org/10.20381/ruor-20346
CollectionThèses, 2011 - // Theses, 2011 -
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