Franz Joseph Haydn’s Sturm und Drang Symphonic Minuets: Convention and Deformation in Form, Cadence, and Meter

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Title: Franz Joseph Haydn’s Sturm und Drang Symphonic Minuets: Convention and Deformation in Form, Cadence, and Meter
Authors: Yount, Kathrine
Date: 2017
Abstract: Franz Joseph Haydn’s (1732-1809) Sturm und Drang years (1768-1773) are described by Mark Evan Bonds as a period of exploration or experimentation of compositional techniques. Based on this premise, this thesis provides in-depth analyses of twenty symphonic minuet movements from the composer’s Sturm und Drang period with the goal of illuminating how Haydn treated the conventionally constrained minuet form. In particular, I discuss how Haydn thwarted formal and rhythmic generic expectations by drawing on James A. Hepokoski and Warren Darcy’s concept of formal deformation. Using William E. Calpin’s theory of formal functions to approach issues of form and cadences, the thesis explores formal and cadential deviations from the Classical norm in aspects of the minuets’ intra-thematic structures, coda/codetta treatment, motivic homogeneity, harmony, and melody. My study also discusses aspects of hypermeter and metrical dissonance through metrical groupings, melodic fragments and dynamics to demonstrate a variety of techniques employed by Haydn to subvert metrical expectations in this dance form through models offered by David W. Beach, Ryan McClelland, and Floyd K. Grave. Finally, a study of the trios of the symphonic movements illustrates how Haydn engaged the middle portion of the movement to highlight the minuets’ deformations, either by normalizing or enlarging formal or metrical deviations. In sum, this thesis argues that Haydn’s creative deviations in the Sturm und Drang Minuet movements exemplify his search to transcend the conventional boundaries of a form heavily saturated in formal, harmonic, cadential, and rhythmic expectations.
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/36035
http://dx.doi.org/10.20381/ruor-20315
CollectionThèses, 2011 - // Theses, 2011 -
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