How Individual Movement Response to Habitat Edges Affects Population Persistence and Spatial Spread

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dc.contributor.authorMaciel, Gabriel Andreguetto
dc.contributor.authorLutscher, Frithjof
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-03T22:14:21Z
dc.date.available2017-01-03T22:14:21Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationThe American Naturalist 182(1)
dc.identifier.issn0003-0147
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10393/35662
dc.description.abstractHow individual-level movement decisions in response to habitat edges influence population-level patterns of persistence and spread of a species is a major challenge in spatial ecology and conservation biology. Here, we integrate novel insights into edge behavior, based on habitat preference and movement rates, into spatially explicit growth-dispersal models. We demonstrate how crucial ecological quantities (e.g., minimal patch size, spread rate) depend critically on these individual-level decisions. In particular, we find that including edge behavior properly in these models gives qualitatively different and intuitively more reasonable results than those of some previous studies that did not consider this level of detail. Our results highlight the importance of new empirical work on individual movement response to habitat edges.
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectedge behavior, spatial heterogeneity, population dynamics, reaction-diffusion equations
dc.titleHow Individual Movement Response to Habitat Edges Affects Population Persistence and Spatial Spread
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/670661
CollectionBiologie // Biology

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