Proportion of children meeting recommendations for 24-hour movement guidelines and associations with adiposity in a 12-country study

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dc.contributor.authorRoman-Viñas, Blanca
dc.contributor.authorChaput, Jean-Philippe
dc.contributor.authorKatzmarzyk, Peter T
dc.contributor.authorFogelholm, Mikael
dc.contributor.authorLambert, Estelle V
dc.contributor.authorMaher, Carol
dc.contributor.authorMaia, Jose
dc.contributor.authorOlds, Timothy
dc.contributor.authorOnywera, Vincent
dc.contributor.authorSarmiento, Olga L
dc.contributor.authorStandage, Martyn
dc.contributor.authorTudor-Locke, Catrine
dc.contributor.authorTremblay, Mark S
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-28T04:18:13Z
dc.date.available2016-11-28T04:18:13Z
dc.date.issued2016-11-25
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. 2016 Nov 25;13(1):123
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12966-016-0449-8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10393/35509
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background The Canadian 24-h movement guidelines were developed with the hope of improving health and future health outcomes in children and youth. The purpose of this study was to evaluate adherence to the 3 recommendations most strongly associated with health outcomes in new 24-h movement guidelines and their relationship with adiposity (obesity and body mass index z-score) across countries participating in the International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment (ISCOLE). Methods Cross-sectional results were based on 6128 children aged 9–11 years from the 12 countries of ISCOLE. Sleep duration and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were assessed using accelerometry. Screen time was measured through self-report. Body weight and height were measured. Body mass index (BMI, kg · m−2) was calculated, and BMI z-scores were computed using age- and sex-specific reference data from the World Health Organization. Obesity was defined as a BMI z-score > +2 SD. Meeting the overall 24-h movement guidelines was defined as: 9 to 11 h/night of sleep, ≤2 h/day of screen time, and at least 60 min/day of MVPA. Age, sex, highest parental education and unhealthy diet pattern score were included as covariates in statistical models. Associations between meeting vs. not meeting each single recommendation (and combinations) with obesity were assessed with odds ratios calculated using generalized linear mixed models. A linear mixed model was used to examine the differences in BMI z-scores between children meeting vs. not meeting the different combinations of recommendations. Results The global prevalence of children meeting the overall recommendations (all three behaviors) was 7%, with children from Australia and Canada showing the highest adherence (15%). Children meeting the three recommendations had lower odds ratios for obesity compared to those meeting none of the recommendations (OR = 0.28, 95% CI 0.18–0.45). Compared to not meeting the 24-h movement recommendations either independently or combined, meeting them was significantly associated with a lower BMI z-score. Whenever the MVPA recommendation was included in the analysis the odds ratios for obesity were lower. Conclusions For ISCOLE participants meeting these 3 healthy movement recommendations the odds ratios of being obese or having high BMI z-scores were lower. However, only a small percentage of children met all recommendations. Future efforts should aim to find promising ways to increase daily physical activity, reduce screen time, and ensure an adequate night’s sleep in children. Trial registration The International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment (ISCOLE) was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier NCT01722500) (October 29, 2012).
dc.titleProportion of children meeting recommendations for 24-hour movement guidelines and associations with adiposity in a 12-country study
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.date.updated2016-11-28T04:18:13Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.rights.holderThe Author(s).
CollectionLibre accès - Publications // Open Access - Publications

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