Police Service Crime Mapping as Civic Technology: A Critical Assessment

FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorScassa, Teresa
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-28T14:48:09Z
dc.date.available2016-07-28T14:48:09Z
dc.date.issued2016-07
dc.identifier.citation(2016) 5:3 International Journal of E-Planning Research 13-26
dc.identifier.issneISSN 2160-9926
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.igi-global.com/article/police-service-crime-mapping-as-civic-technology/158035
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10393/35042
dc.description.abstractIt is increasingly common for municipal police services in North America to make online crime maps available to the public. This form of civic technology is now so widely used that there is a competitive private sector market for crime mapping platforms. This paper considers the crime maps made available by three Canadian police forces using platforms developed by U.S.-based private sector corporations. The paper considers how these crime maps present particular narratives of crime in the city, evaluates the quality of the mapped data, and explores how laws shape and constrain the use and reuse of crime data. It considers as well the problems that may arise in using off-the-shelf solutions – particularly ones developed in another country. It asks whether this model of crime mapping advances or limits goals of transparency and accountability, and what lessons it offers about the use of private sector civic technologies to serve public sector purposes.
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectmapping
dc.subjectcrime data
dc.subjectopen data
dc.subjectdata ownership
dc.subjectpolice
dc.subjectprivacy
dc.subjectcrime maps
dc.titlePolice Service Crime Mapping as Civic Technology: A Critical Assessment
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.doiDOI: 10.4018/IJEPR.2016070102
CollectionCommon law - Publications // Common Law - Publications

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