Perceptions of Female Aggression on Reality Television

FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorDonovan, Kathleen
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-11T16:54:12Z
dc.date.available2016-07-11T16:54:12Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10393/34973
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.20381/ruor-4925
dc.description.abstractDespite the detrimental effects of aggression, Reality Television is replete with portrayals of female direct and indirect aggression for the sake of entertainment. Direct, physical and verbal aggression may be easy to identify but indirect aggression can be circuitous and subtle such as gossiping and exclusion from the group. Victims of indirect aggression can experience long-term psychological repercussions such as depression, anxiety, low self-esteem and self-abusive behaviour. Exposure to indirect relational aggression on Reality Television has also been shown to increase physical aggression in its viewers. Combining three theoretical frameworks this study draws on social cognitive theory, cultivation theory as well as feminist frameworks. Female adults were recruited to participate in semi-structured interviews discussing their perceptions and influence of Reality Television clips portraying female aggression.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversité d'Ottawa / University of Ottawa
dc.subjectReality Television
dc.subjectindirect aggression
dc.subjectverbal aggression
dc.subjectpost-feminism
dc.titlePerceptions of Female Aggression on Reality Television
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.supervisorJaya, Peruvemba
thesis.degree.nameMA
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.disciplineArts
uottawa.departmentCommunication
CollectionThèses, 2011 - // Theses, 2011 -

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