Is Kangaroo Care an Effective Intervention to Reduce Heel Stick Pain Response in Preterm Infants?

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Title: Is Kangaroo Care an Effective Intervention to Reduce Heel Stick Pain Response in Preterm Infants?
Authors: Doyle, Kathryn
Dillon-Fordyce, Philippa
Date: 2015-12-05
Abstract: Background: Approximately 15 million babies are born prematurely each year. Preterm infants admitted to the NICU undergo painful procedures (a heel stick for blood monitoring is most common). Experiences of pain or stress in very early life are associated with negative effects that may endure throughout the lifespan. Pharmacological interventions (e.g., opioids, topical analgesics) have shown limited effectiveness against procedural pain in preterm infants; therefore, it is important to investigate non-pharmacological approaches to pain relief. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) in reducing heel stick pain response in preterm infants. Methods: We conducted a structured literature review of the databases PubMed and SCOPUS using the keywords: kangaroo mother care, skin-to-skin contact, procedural pain response, pain, heel prick and preterm infants. Exclusion criteria: non-English language studies, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and studies including term infants, infants with additional conditions, and KMC as an adjunctive therapy. Results: Out of nine relevant studies, four studied Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) scores and found significantly reduced heel stick pain responses in infants receiving KMC. Four other studies focused primarily on duration of cry (DOC), and found that DOC was significantly shorter with KMC intervention. One study analyzed both measures and found that KMC was associated with significant decreases in PIPP scores and DOC. Conclusion: The evidence supports the use of KMC to reduce heel stick pain responses in preterm infants. Further research is needed to evaluate effectiveness of KMC for other acute pain procedures, and infants with additional conditions.
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/34355
CollectionSciences de la santé - Affiches // Health Sciences - Research Posters
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