Don’t Move Me There! Promoting Autonomy in the Provision of Long-term Care for Seniors in Canada

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Title: Don’t Move Me There! Promoting Autonomy in the Provision of Long-term Care for Seniors in Canada
Authors: McGinn, Lindsay
Date: 2016-01-19
Abstract: Like many countries around the world, Canada’s population is aging. Not only will there be a significant increase in the number of older adults over the coming years, but increasingly these seniors will fall into the oldest-old category, those over the age of 80. These elderly seniors are more likely then their younger counterparts to reside in long-term care facilities. The current system of long-term care in Canada leaves much to be desired by older adults who’s overwhelming wish is to remain in their own homes as long as possible. Many older adults fear a move into long-term care because of the restrictions on their personal freedom and choice. More and more seniors will be looking to long-term care facilities to provide living arrangements that allow them to remain autonomous for as long as possible. The right to autonomy for residents in long-term care is a positive right that governments must protect. This right requires the provision of long-term care services and faculties that promote autonomy for Canadian seniors. A number of international models provide innovative ways to design and delivery long-term care. These examples provide a starting place for all levels of government to re-imagine long-term care in Canada. A movement away from the institution, to facilities and services that feel more like home and promote autonomy in the lives of seniors.
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/34146
CollectionAffaires publiques et internationales - Mémoires // Public and International Affairs - Research Papers
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