Impact of milk consumption on cardiometabolic risk in postmenopausal women with abdominal obesity

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Title: Impact of milk consumption on cardiometabolic risk in postmenopausal women with abdominal obesity
Authors: Drouin-Chartier, Jean-Philippe
Gagnon, Josée
Labonté, Marie-Ève
Desroches, Sophie
Charest, Amélie
Grenier, Geneviève
Dodin, Sylvie
Lemieux, Simone
Couture, Patrick
Lamarche, Benoît
Date: 2015-01-21
Abstract: Abstract Background The impact of dairy intake on cardiometabolic risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS) needs further research. Objective To investigate the impact of milk consumption on a wide array of cardiometabolic risk factors associated with MetS (blood lipids, cholesterol homeostasis, glucose homeostasis, systemic inflammation, blood pressure, endothelial function) in postmenopausal women with abdominal obesity. Methods In this randomized, crossover study, 27 women with abdominal obesity consumed two 6-week diets based on the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP), one with 3.2 servings/d of 2% fat milk per 2000 kcal (MILK) and one without milk or other dairy (NCEP). The macronutrient composition of both diets was comparable (55% carbohydrates, 15% proteins, 30% fat and 10% saturated fat). Results The MILK diet had no significant effect on LDL-C, triglycerides, LDL size, CRP and cell adhesion molecule concentrations and on indicators of insulin sensitivity. The MILK diet reduced HDL-C, adiponectin, endothelin and fasting glucose levels as well blood pressure (all P ≤ 0.01), but those changes were comparable to those seen with the NCEP milk-free diet (all between-diet P ≥ 0.07). Finally, the MILK diet was associated with lower VLDL apolipoprotein B fractional catabolic rate (−13.4%; P = 0.04) and plasma sterol concentrations (−12.0%; P = 0.04) compared with the control NCEP milk-free diet. Conclusions These data suggest that short-term consumption of low fat milk in the context of a prudent NCEP diet has no favorable nor deleterious effect on cardiometabolic risk factors associated with MetS in postmenopausal women with abdominal obesity.
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-2891-14-12
http://hdl.handle.net/10393/33097
CollectionLibre accès - Publications // Open Access - Publications
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