Geographical variations in risk factors associated with HIV infection among drug users in a prefecture in Southwest China

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Title: Geographical variations in risk factors associated with HIV infection among drug users in a prefecture in Southwest China
Authors: Zhou, Yi-Biao
Wang, Qi-Xing
Liang, Song
Gong, Yu-Han
Yang, Mei-Xiao
Chen, Yue
Nie, Shi-Jiao
Nan, Lei
Yang, Ai-Hui
Liao, Qiang
Yang, Yang
Song, Xiu-Xia
Jiang, Qing-Wu
Date: 2015-09-02
Abstract: Abstract Background Previous studies have shown inconsistent or even contradictory results for some risk factors associated with HIV infection among drug users, and these may be partially explained by geographical variations. Methods Data were collected from 11 methadone clinics in the Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture from 2004 to 2012. A non-spatial logistical regression model and a geographically weighted logistic regression model were fitted to analyze the association between HIV infection and specific factors at the individual level. Results This study enrolled 6,458 patients. The prevalence of HIV infection was 25.1 %. The non-spatial model indicated that being divorced was positively associated with HIV infection. The spatial model also showed that being divorced was positively associated with HIV infection, but only for 49.4 % of individuals residing in some northern counties. The non-spatial model suggested that service sector work was negatively associated with HIV infection. However, the spatial model indicated that service work was associated with HIV infection, but only for 23.0 % of patients living in some western counties. The non-spatial model did not show that being married was associated with HIV infection in our study field, but the spatial model indicated that being married was negatively associated with HIV infection for 12.0 % of individuals living in some western counties. For other factors, the non-spatial and spatial models showed similar results. Conclusion The spatial model may be useful for improving understanding of geographical heterogeneity in the relationship between HIV infection and individual factors. Spatial heterogeneity may be useful for tailoring intervention strategies for local regions, which can consequently result in a more efficient allocation of limited resources toward the control of HIV transmission.
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40249-015-0073-x
http://hdl.handle.net/10393/33088
CollectionLibre accès - Publications // Open Access - Publications
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