Maternal intravenous fluids and postpartum breast changes: a pilot observational study

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Title: Maternal intravenous fluids and postpartum breast changes: a pilot observational study
Authors: Kujawa-Myles, Sonya
Noel-Weiss, Joy
Dunn, Sandra
Peterson, Wendy E
Cotterman, Kermaline J
Date: 2015-06-02
Abstract: Abstract Background The current breastfeeding initiation rate in Canada is approximately 87%. By one month, about 21% of women have stopped breastfeeding. Engorgement and edema in breast tissue can lead to breastfeeding challenges which may contribute to early weaning. The aims of this pilot research study were to explore the relationship between intrapartum intravenous fluids given to mothers and postpartum breast swelling in the first 10 days postpartum and to determine if a larger study was warranted and feasible. Methods A prospective, longitudinal, observational cohort pilot study with repeated measures and a within-subjects design was completed. Participants were first time mothers who have a single, healthy newborn and had a spontaneous vaginal birth. Daily data collection from admission into the study until postpartum day 10 took place. Descriptive statistics are reported and linear regression analysis was used to model the relationship between IV therapy and postpartum breast edema. Results Women who received intravenous fluids during labour had higher levels of breast edema postpartum and rated their breasts as firmer and more tender than women who did not receive intravenous fluids. Participants who had intravenous fluids described patterns of fullness that appeared to be related to edema as opposed to fullness associated with engorgement and lactogenesis II. Conclusions The findings demonstrate that mothers in this pilot study who received intravenous fluids in labour and postpartum had higher levels of breast edema. These results suggest a larger study is warranted to more fully examine the effects of intravenous fluids on postpartum breast swelling.
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13006-015-0043-8
http://hdl.handle.net/10393/33062
CollectionLibre accès - Publications // Open Access - Publications
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