The Impact of Auditory and Visual Cognitive Tasks on Postural Control in Young Adults

FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorPolskaia, Nadia
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T19:05:25Z
dc.date.available2015-09-18T19:05:25Z
dc.date.created2015
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10393/32870
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.20381/ruor-2781
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the present thesis was two-fold. First, to evaluate the impact of cognitive demand on postural control in young adults and second, to examine the responsiveness of postural control to cognitive tasks presented in varying modalities. Seventeen young adults stood on a force platform while simultaneously performing cognitive tasks of varying difficulty (easy, moderate and difficult), each presented auditorily and visually. Performing the moderate and difficult tasks precipitated a greater reduction in area of 95% confidence ellipse and medio-lateral (ML) sway variability compared to the easy tasks. Presenting the tasks visually produced lower ML sway variability than presenting the tasks auditorily. Of secondary interest of this thesis was to determine if the duration of inter-stimulus intervals could modify the effectiveness of a cognitive task on postural control. Participants stood on a force platform while simultaneously performing cognitive tasks with five-second inter-stimulus intervals (i.e. discrete) and two-second inter-stimulus intervals (i.e. continuous), each presented auditorily and visually. Results revealed higher anterior-posterior (AP) mean power frequency (MPF) when performing the continuous tasks. In addition, presented the tasks visually resulted in a greater reduction in area of 95% confidence ellipse, AP and ML sway variability.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversité d'Ottawa / University of Ottawa
dc.subjectPostural control
dc.subjectDual-task
dc.subjectCognitive Task
dc.subjectSensory Modality
dc.titleThe Impact of Auditory and Visual Cognitive Tasks on Postural Control in Young Adults
dc.typeThesis
dc.faculty.departmentSciences de l'activité physique / Human Kinetics
dc.contributor.supervisorLajoie, Yves
dc.degree.nameMSc
dc.degree.levelmasters
dc.degree.disciplineSciences de la santé / Health Sciences
thesis.degree.nameMSc
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.disciplineSciences de la santé / Health Sciences
uottawa.departmentSciences de l'activité physique / Human Kinetics
CollectionThèses, 2011 - // Theses, 2011 -

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