The association between Epstein-Barr virus contributing to diagnosis of Hodgkin’s Lymphoma in young adults

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Title: The association between Epstein-Barr virus contributing to diagnosis of Hodgkin’s Lymphoma in young adults
Authors: Mahava, Ferzin
Lavigne, Melissa
Date: 2015-04-11
Abstract: Background: Hodgkin’s lymphoma is a cancer of the immune system accounting for less than 1% of cancers worldwide. In Hodgkin's lymphoma, cells in the lymphatic system grow abnormally due to an excess number of Reed‐Sternberg cells, and may spread beyond the lymphatic system, affecting one’s ability to fight infection. This disease is most prevalent in young adults between 15‐35 years and after the age of 55. Although Hodgkin’s lymphoma has no confirmed risk factors, it has been suggested that Epstein‐Barr virus may increase an individual’s risk of developing Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Epstein‐Barr virus, best known for causing infectious mononucleosis, has been linked to other types of immune system related cancers as well. Objective: A review of the literature was done to assess the evidence regarding the association between Hodgkin’s lymphoma and Epstein‐Barr virus in young adults. Methods: A structured literature review was conducted to find evidence of an association between Epstein‐Barr virus and Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Peer‐reviewed articles were collected from SCOPUS, using the keywords “Epstein‐Barr”, “Hodgkin’s Lymphoma”, “female” and “young”. Articles were assessed to meet inclusion criteria through publication date, language, and title and abstract scope. Results: The literature search revealed that there is an association between a positive Epstein‐Barr virus infection and Hodgkin’s lymphoma in young adults. Studies indicate differences in the strength of the association reported in young adults diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The literature shows evidence of a stronger association in certain geographical regions around the world. Conclusion: The literature provides evidence of an association between Hodgkin’s lymphoma and Epstein‐Barr virus in young adults. Further studies are needed to show the strength of association, specifically targeting young adults between the ages of 15‐35, as Hodgkin’s lymphoma peaks in this age group.
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/32349
CollectionSciences de la santé - Affiches // Health Sciences - Research Posters
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