Housing and Homelessness: Two Models of the Relationship Between Quality of Life, Physical Health, and Mental Health

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Title: Housing and Homelessness: Two Models of the Relationship Between Quality of Life, Physical Health, and Mental Health
Authors: Andrea, Andrea Ximena
Date: 2015
Abstract: With the increase in quality of life (QoL) research in recent years and its relationship to physical and mental health, building a model of these relationships is an important pursuit for researchers with the aim of creating targeted social policy and programs. Two studies were designed to test a model of the relationship between quality of life, physical health, and mental health on two different groups in the National-Capital region: a housed sample and a homeless and vulnerably housed sample. Study 1 consisted of 1,339 adults who took part in the 2007-2008 Canadian Community Health Survey and were stably housed in either a rented or owned residence. Study 2 consisted of 395 single adults who participated in the City of Ottawa baseline measure of the Health and Housing in Transition (HHiT) study (Hwang, Aubry, et al., 2011) and were homeless or vulnerably housed. Subjective levels of various physical and mental health indicators were measured for each of the samples, along with subjective quality of life indicators. Of interest in each of the studies was: 1) The effect that physical and mental health factors have on quality of life in each of the samples, and 2) determining if mental health or physical health is a better predictor of quality of life. Structural analysis of the housed sample model resulted in both physical and mental health having a significant positive effect on QoL, although neither physical nor mental health was a better predictor of quality of life. For the homeless and vulnerably housed model, structural analysis determined mental health to have a significant direct positive effect on QoL, while physical health showed a non-significant negative effect. Mental health was determined to be a significantly better predictor of QoL in the homeless and vulnerably housed model, accounting for 30.47 percent of the variance in quality of life. Implications of this research are discussed.
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/31902
http://dx.doi.org/10.20381/ruor-6790
CollectionThèses, 2011 - // Theses, 2011 -
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