“Accumulation by Dispossession” by the Global Extractive Industry: The Case of Canada

FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorKinuthia, Wanyee
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-13T22:01:56Z
dc.date.available2013-11-13T22:01:56Z
dc.date.created2013
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10393/30170
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.20381/ruor-3366
dc.description.abstractThis thesis draws on David Harvey’s concept of “accumulation by dispossession” and an international political economy (IPE) approach centred on the institutional arrangements and power structures that privilege certain actors and values, in order to critique current capitalist practices of primitive accumulation by the global corporate extractive industry. The thesis examines how accumulation by dispossession by the global extractive industry is facilitated by the “free entry” or “free mining” principle. It does so by focusing on Canada as a leader in the global extractive industry and the spread of this country’s mining laws to other countries – in other words, the transnationalisation of norms in the global extractive industry – so as to maintain a consistent and familiar operating environment for Canadian extractive companies. The transnationalisation of norms is further promoted by key international institutions such as the World Bank, which is also the world’s largest development lender and also plays a key role in shaping the regulations that govern natural resource extraction. The thesis briefly investigates some Canadian examples of resource extraction projects, in order to demonstrate the weaknesses of Canadian mining laws, particularly the lack of protection of landowners’ rights under the free entry system and the subsequent need for “free, prior and informed consent” (FPIC). The thesis also considers some of the challenges to the adoption and implementation of the right to FPIC. These challenges include embedded institutional structures like the free entry mining system, international political economy (IPE) as shaped by international institutions and powerful corporations, as well as concerns regarding ‘local’ power structures or the legitimacy of representatives of communities affected by extractive projects. The thesis concludes that in order for Canada to be truly recognized as a leader in the global extractive industry, it must establish legal norms domestically to ensure that Canadian mining companies and residents can be held accountable when there is evidence of environmental and/or human rights violations associated with the activities of Canadian mining companies abroad. The thesis also concludes that Canada needs to address underlying structural issues such as the free entry mining system and implement FPIC, in order to curb “accumulation by dispossession” by the extractive industry, both domestically and abroad.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversité d'Ottawa / University of Ottawa
dc.subjectnatural resources
dc.subjectraw materials
dc.subjectglobal extractive industry
dc.subjectmining
dc.subjectaccumulation by dispossession
dc.subjectprimitive accumulation
dc.subjectresource curse
dc.subjectfree, prior, and informed consent (FPIC)
dc.subjectconsultation
dc.subjectfree entry
dc.subjectBill C-300
dc.subjectOmnibus Bill
dc.subjectself-determination
dc.subjectmadaraka
dc.subjectmultinational / transnational corporations
dc.subjectland grabs
dc.subjectgovernance gap
dc.subjectenforcement vacuum
dc.subjectregulatory gap
dc.subjectlandlessness
dc.subjectinvoluntary resettlement
dc.subjectdisplacement
dc.subjectliberalization
dc.subjectfinancial markets
dc.subjectcapitalism
dc.subjectInternational Monetary Fund (IMF)
dc.subjectCanadian Network on Corporate Accountability (CNCA)
dc.subjectEnvironmental Impact Assessment (EIA)
dc.subjectImpact and Benefits Agreement (IBA)
dc.subjectcorporate social responsibility (CSR)
dc.subjectinternational political economy (IPE)
dc.subjectWashington Consensus
dc.subjectPoverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP)
dc.subjectsustainable development
dc.subjectrare earth
dc.subjectoil
dc.subjectfossil fuels
dc.subjectWhitehorse Mining Initiative (WMI)
dc.subjectforeign direct investment (FDI)
dc.subjectprivatization
dc.subjectCanadian Centre for the Study of Resource Conflict (CCSRC)
dc.subjectStanding Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade (SCFAIT)
dc.subjectForeign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD)
dc.subjectneoliberal / corporate globalization
dc.subjectNorthern Gateway pipeline project
dc.subjectRing of Fire
dc.subjectcentre-periphery
dc.subjectmetropolitan-hinterland
dc.subjectOrganization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)
dc.subjectGross Domestic Product (GDP)
dc.subjectExtractive Industries Review (EIR)
dc.subjectSub-Saharan Africa
dc.subjectwar on terror
dc.subjectterrorists
dc.subjectfalse flag terrorism
dc.subjectFisheries Act
dc.subjectNavigable Waters Protection Act
dc.subjectprimary goods
dc.subjectaid
dc.subjectThird World debt
dc.subjectfree trade
dc.subjectmodernization
dc.subjectdependency
dc.subjecttariffs
dc.subjecttrade barriers
dc.subjectHudBay
dc.subjecthome country liability
dc.subjectstate
dc.subjectToronto Stock Exchange (TSX)
dc.subjectProspectors and Developers Association of Canada (PDAC)
dc.subjectspatio-temporal fix
dc.subjectmilitarism
dc.subjectSudbury
dc.subjectAtlantic Canada
dc.subjectCrown
dc.subjectneo-colonialism
dc.subjectindustrial revolution
dc.subjectimperialism
dc.subjectpublic policy
dc.subjectdemocracy
dc.subjectjustice
dc.subjectCanadian International Development Agency (CIDA)
dc.subjectExport Development Corporation (EDC)
dc.subjectKimberley Process
dc.subjectInternational Council on Mining and Metals (ICMM)
dc.subjectMining Association of Canada
dc.subjectNational Roundtables on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and the Canadian Extractive Industry in Developing Countries
dc.subjectequity
dc.subjectausterity measures
dc.subjectEnvironmental Commissioner of Ontario (ECO)
dc.subjectMining Act reforms
dc.subjectproletariat
dc.subjectaboriginal
dc.subjectLeast Developed Countries (LDCs)
dc.subjectdeveloping country
dc.subjectcomparative advantage
dc.subjecthuman rights
dc.subjectexport-led development
dc.subjectTiomin
dc.subjectGovernment of Kenya
dc.subjectGovernment of Canada
dc.subjectEconomic and Social Council (ECOSOC)
dc.subjectWorld Bank Group (WBG)
dc.subjectWorld Trade Organization (WTO)
dc.subjectUnited Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP)
dc.subjectBill C-38
dc.subjectBill C-45
dc.subjectAssembly of First Nations (AFN)
dc.subjectIdle No More
dc.subjectmeaningful participation
dc.subjectAFRICOM
dc.subjecttitanium
dc.subjectBase Resources Australia
dc.subjectHouse of Commons
dc.subjectconditionalities
dc.subjectStructural Adjustment Programmes (SAPs)
dc.subjectWorld Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD)
dc.title“Accumulation by Dispossession” by the Global Extractive Industry: The Case of Canada
dc.typeThesis
dc.faculty.departmentDéveloppement international et mondialisation / International Development and Global Studies
dc.contributor.supervisorAbrahamsen, Rita
dc.embargo.termsimmediate
dc.degree.nameMA
dc.degree.levelmasters
dc.degree.disciplineSciences sociales / Social Sciences
thesis.degree.nameMA
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.disciplineSciences sociales / Social Sciences
uottawa.departmentDéveloppement international et mondialisation / International Development and Global Studies
CollectionThèses, 2011 - // Theses, 2011 -

Files