"Yesterday, today, and forever": The mythic foundations of the Ku Klux Klan in the United States and Canada

FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorBryant, Andrew M
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-07T17:25:07Z
dc.date.available2013-11-07T17:25:07Z
dc.date.created2004
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationSource: Masters Abstracts International, Volume: 43-06, page: 1972.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10393/26592
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.20381/ruor-18260
dc.description.abstractThe Ku Klux Klan has been active in North America for 139 years and organizations like the Klan have existed in North America since before the United States and Canada became independent nations. The white supremacy advocated by the Klan mimics the justifications used by colonial powers, and though the United States and Canada have espoused egalitarian ideals for quite some time, the Klan continues to attract members. Mircea Eliade and Claude Levi-Strauss have argued that history and myth share many characteristics, and that sometimes history can act as myth. Understanding how North American history can be a mythic model for the religious formation of North American people one can better explain the long-term viability of the Klan and its ability not only to inspire violence, but to articulate a particular kind of white North American identity. This study examines how the religiosity and action of the Klan has been informed by mytho-historical influences in the United States and Canada and, consequently, how these influences affect other people formed in this context.
dc.format.extent113 p.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Ottawa (Canada)
dc.subject.classificationReligion, General.
dc.subject.classificationReligion, History of.
dc.subject.classificationHistory, Canadian.
dc.subject.classificationHistory, United States.
dc.title"Yesterday, today, and forever": The mythic foundations of the Ku Klux Klan in the United States and Canada
dc.typeThesis
dc.degree.nameM.A.
dc.degree.levelMasters
CollectionTh├Ęses, 1910 - 2010 // Theses, 1910 - 2010

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