A pilot study: research poster presentations as an educational tool for undergraduate epidemiology students

FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorDeonandan, R
dc.contributor.authorGomes, J
dc.contributor.authorLavigne, E
dc.contributor.authorDinh, T
dc.contributor.authorBlanchard, R
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-23T20:06:03Z
dc.date.available2013-09-23T20:06:03Z
dc.date.created2013
dc.date.issued2013-09-23
dc.identifier.citationAdvances in Medical Education and Practice, 2013;4:183-188
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10393/26164
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.dovepress.com/articles.php?article_id=14438
dc.description.abstractStudents in a fourth year epidemiology course were surveyed after participating in a formal Science Research Day in which they presented original research, in poster form, to be judged by scientists from the community. Of 276 participating students, 80 (29%) responded to the study survey. As a result, 19% of respondents were more likely to pursue a career in science, and 27.5% were more likely to pursue a career in epidemiology. Only one respondent reported being less likely to pursue a science career, while seven were less likely to pursue epidemiology. A majority of respondents felt that the poster experience was on par with, or superior to, a comparable research paper, in terms of both educational appeal and enjoyment. Mandatory, formal poster presentations are an innovative format for teaching advanced health sciences, and may more accurately reflect the realities of a science career than do more traditional educational formats
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectepidemiology
dc.subjecteducation
dc.subjectundergraduate
dc.subjectresearch-teaching nexus
dc.titleA pilot study: research poster presentations as an educational tool for undergraduate epidemiology students
dc.typeArticle
CollectionSciences de la santé - Publications // Health Sciences - Publications

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