Human-Ecosystem Interactions in Relation to Holocene Climate Change in Port Joli Harbour, Southwestern Nova Scotia, Canada

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Title: Human-Ecosystem Interactions in Relation to Holocene Climate Change in Port Joli Harbour, Southwestern Nova Scotia, Canada
Authors: Neil, Karen
Date: 2013
Abstract: A high-resolution pollen record from Path Lake (43°87’00”N, 64°92’42”W, 10m asl) in Port Joli Harbour, Nova Scotia, Canada, was used to provide a paleo-ecological perspective on Holocene climate and vegetation variability within the context of local archaeological research. Pollen assemblages in the early Holocene reflect a post-glacial forest dominated by Pinus, Tsuga, Betula and Quercus. Shallow water aquatic and wetland taxa increased after 3400 cal. yr. BP in response to wetter climatic conditions. Increased settlement intensity of native inhabitants coincides with late-Holocene climate change at a regional scale, suggesting that environmental conditions may have influenced prehistoric human activities. European settlement, after 350 cal. yr. BP, was marked by a rise in Ambrosia, and peak charcoal accumulation rates after this time showed evidence of human disturbance on the landscape. This study suggests that environmental changes affected human exploitation of the landscape, and human activity altered forest composition in the late Holocene.
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/24347
http://dx.doi.org/10.20381/ruor-3113
CollectionThèses, 2011 - // Theses, 2011 -
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