Mining the Management Literature for Insights into Implementing Evidence-Based Change in Healthcare

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Title: Mining the Management Literature for Insights into Implementing Evidence-Based Change in Healthcare
Authors: Harlos, Karen
Tetroe, Jacqueline
Graham, Ian D.
Bird, Madeleine
Robinson, Nicole
Date: 2012
Abstract: Objective: We synthesized the management and health literatures for insights into implementing evidence-based change in healthcare drawn from industry-specific data. Because change principles based on evidence often fail to be translated into organizational practice or policy, we sought studies at the nexus of organizational change and knowledge translation. Methods: We reviewed five top management journals to identify an initial pool of 3,091 studies, which yielded a final sample of 100 studies. Data were abstracted, verified by the original authors and revised before entry into a database. We employed a systematic narrative synthesis approach using words and text to distill data and explain relationships. We categorized studies by varying levels of relevance for knowledge translation as (1) primary, direct; (2) intermediate; and (3) secondary, indirect. We also identified recurring categories of change-related organizational factors. The current analysis examines these factors in studies of primary relevance to knowledge translation, which we also coded for intervention readiness to reflect how readily change can be implemented. Preliminary Results and Conclusions: Results centred on five change-related categories: Tailoring the Intervention Message; Institutional Links/Social Networks; Training; Quality of Work Relationships; and Fit to Organization. In particular, networks across institutional and individual levels appeared as prominent pathways for changing healthcare organizations. Power dynamics, positive social relations and team structures also played key roles in implementing change and translating it into practice. We analyzed journals in which first authors of these studies typically publish, and found evidence that management and health sciences remain divided. Bridging these disciplines through research syntheses promises a wealth of evidence and insights, well worth mining in the search for change that works in healthcare transformation.
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/24030
http://www.longwoods.com/content/23016
DOI: 10.12927.hcpol.2012.23016
CollectionLibre accès uOttawa - Publications // uOttawa Open Access - Publications
Sciences infirmières // Nursing
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