Feminine Discourse and the "Frequently Neglected Area" of Mental Hygiene in 1950s Ontario Elementary Health Textbooks

FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorAinsworth, Marie K
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-19T14:06:31Z
dc.date.available2012-11-19T14:06:31Z
dc.date.created2012
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10393/23515
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.20381/ruor-6207
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines how mental hygiene principles were adopted for a student audience through the elementary-level health textbooks series, Health and Personal Development, used in Ontario schools from 1952 until 1963. In particular, I explore the didactic messages pertaining to mental hygiene as they related to girls. The results of this analysis demonstrate that healthy mental hygiene and personal development for girls, according to the textbooks, meant becoming wives, mothers, and homemakers, as their own mothers model. While these roles required many skills and responsibilities, and provided women with a certain amount of agency in the female-dominated sphere, girls were represented in the textbooks as having a limited set of options in life: to emulate their mothers’ feminine domesticity, or to risk a life marred by poor mental hygiene.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversité d'Ottawa / University of Ottawa
dc.subjectwomen
dc.subjecthistory
dc.subjecteducation
dc.subjecttextbooks
dc.subjectmental hygiene
dc.subjecthealth
dc.subjecttwentieth century
dc.titleFeminine Discourse and the "Frequently Neglected Area" of Mental Hygiene in 1950s Ontario Elementary Health Textbooks
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.supervisorStanley, Timothy
dc.embargo.termsimmediate
dc.degree.nameMA[Ed]
dc.degree.levelmasters
dc.degree.disciplineÉducation / Education
thesis.degree.nameMA[Ed]
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.disciplineÉducation / Education
CollectionThèses, 2011 - // Theses, 2011 -

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