From Rehabilitation to Punishment: American Corrections after 1945

FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLux, Erin
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-12T13:37:40Z
dc.date.available2012-11-12T13:37:40Z
dc.date.created2012
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10393/23504
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.20381/ruor-6197
dc.description.abstractThe incarceration rate in the United States has increased dramatically in the period since 1945. How did the United States move from having stable incarceration rates in line with global norms to the largest system of incarceration in the world? This study examines the political and intellectual aspects of incarceration and theories of criminal justice by looking at the contributions of journalists, intellectuals and policy makers to the debate on whether the purpose of the justice system is rehabilitation, vengeance, deterrence or incapacitation. This thesis finds that justice and the institution of the prison itself are not immutable facts of modern civilization, but are human institutions vulnerable to the influence of politics, culture and current events.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversité d'Ottawa / University of Ottawa
dc.subjecthistory
dc.subjectprisons
dc.subjectAmerican History
dc.subjectConservatism
dc.subjectGoldwater
dc.subjectincarceration
dc.subjectNixon
dc.subjectNew Right
dc.subjectJohnson
dc.subjectCarter
dc.subjectFord
dc.subjectBush
dc.subjectpolicy
dc.subjectpolitics
dc.subjectReagan
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.titleFrom Rehabilitation to Punishment: American Corrections after 1945
dc.typeThesis
dc.faculty.departmentHistoire / History
dc.contributor.supervisorMurray, Heather
dc.embargo.termsimmediate
dc.degree.nameMA
dc.degree.levelmasters
dc.degree.disciplineArts
thesis.degree.nameMA
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.disciplineArts
uottawa.departmentHistoire / History
CollectionThèses, 2011 - // Theses, 2011 -

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