What Eros and Anamnesis Can Tell Us About Knowledge of Virtue in Plato's Protagoras, Symposium, and Meno

FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorVendetti, Rebecca A.
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-26T19:06:06Z
dc.date.available2012-01-26T19:06:06Z
dc.date.created2012
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10393/20648
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.20381/ruor-5429
dc.description.abstractThe goal of this thesis is ultimately to answer the two questions raised and left unresolved in Plato’s Protagoras: What is virtue? Is virtue teachable? Following the dramatic order of Plato’s dialogues as outlined by Catherine Zuckert, I intend to show that the Meno returns to the issues raised and left unresolved in the Protagoras, but now with the idea of recollection. My intention is to look at how the idea of recollection, developed and associated with eros in the intervening dialogues, can help explain the nature of virtue and its teachability. I believe that we can come to answer both questions, “What is virtue?” and “Is virtue teachable?” posed in the Protagoras and the Meno by drawing on the ideas of anamnesis and eros as they appear in the Meno, Phaedrus, and Symposium.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversité d'Ottawa / University of Ottawa
dc.subjectvirtue
dc.subjectrecollection
dc.subjectanamnesis
dc.subjectSocrates
dc.subjectPlato
dc.subjectPhaedrus
dc.subjectSymposium
dc.subjectProtagoras
dc.subjectMeno
dc.titleWhat Eros and Anamnesis Can Tell Us About Knowledge of Virtue in Plato's Protagoras, Symposium, and Meno
dc.typeThesis
dc.faculty.departmentPhilosophie / Philosophy
dc.contributor.supervisorGonzalez, Francisco
dc.embargo.termsimmediate
dc.degree.nameMA
dc.degree.levelmasters
dc.degree.disciplinearts
thesis.degree.nameMA
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.disciplinearts
uottawa.departmentPhilosophie / Philosophy
CollectionThèses, 2011 - // Theses, 2011 -

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