Comparison of primary care models in the prevention of cardiovascular disease - a cross sectional study

FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLiddy, Clare
dc.contributor.authorSingh, Jatinderpreet
dc.contributor.authorHogg, William
dc.contributor.authorDahrouge, Simone
dc.contributor.authorTaljaard, Monica
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-30T01:51:57Z
dc.date.available2011-11-30T01:51:57Z
dc.date.created2011
dc.date.issued2011-11-29
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10393/20450
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2296/12/114
dc.description.abstractBackground: Primary care providers play an important role in preventing and managing cardiovascular disease. This study compared the quality of preventive cardiovascular care delivery amongst different primary care models. Methods: This is a secondary analysis of a larger randomized control trial, known as the Improved Delivery of Cardiovascular Care (IDOCC) through Outreach Facilitation. Using baseline data collected through IDOCC, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 82 primary care practices from three delivery models in Eastern Ontario, Canada: 43 fee-for-service, 27 blended-capitation and 12 community health centres with salary-based physicians. Medical chart audits from 4,808 patients with or at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease were used to examine each practice’s adherence to ten evidence-based processes of care for diabetes, chronic kidney disease, dyslipidemia, hypertension, weight management, and smoking cessation care. Generalized estimating equation models adjusting for age, sex, rurality, number of cardiovascular-related comorbidities, and year of data collection were used to compare guideline adherence amongst the three models. Results: The percentage of patients with diabetes that received two hemoglobin A1c tests during the study year was significantly higher in community health centres (69%) than in fee-for-service (45%) practices (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 2.4 [95% CI 1.4-4.2], p = 0.001). Blended capitation practices had a significantly higher percentage of patients who had their waistlines monitored than in fee-for-service practices (19% vs. 5%, AOR = 3.7 [1.8-7.8], p = 0.0006), and who were recommended a smoking cessation drug when compared to community health centres (33% vs. 16%, AOR = 2.4 [1.3-4.6], p = 0.007). Overall, quality of diabetes care was higher in community health centres, while smoking cessation care and weight management was higher in the blended-capitation models. Feefor- service practices had the greatest gaps in care, most noticeably in diabetes care and weight management. Conclusions: This study adds to the evidence suggesting that primary care delivery model impacts quality of care. These findings support current Ontario reforms to move away from the traditional fee-for-service practice.
dc.language.isoen
dc.titleComparison of primary care models in the prevention of cardiovascular disease - a cross sectional study
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2296-12-114
CollectionCentre de recherche C.T. Lamont // C.T. Lamont Research Centre
Publications en libre accès financées par uOttawa // uOttawa financed open access publications

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