A Tale of Two Containments: The United States, Canada, and National Security during the Korean War, 1945--1951

Description
Title: A Tale of Two Containments: The United States, Canada, and National Security during the Korean War, 1945--1951
Authors: Turek, Tyler John
Date: 2010
Abstract: In the first comparative study of Canadian and American foreign policy during the Korean War, this thesis argues that, while Canada and the U.S. shared some similar foreign policy goals and interpretations of the Soviet Union between 1945 and 1951, their national security policies were fundamentally distinct. In turn, these differing interpretations had a significant influence on each country's understanding of the Korean War. The United States believed that it had to uphold its international prestige by defending freedom everywhere in order to remain secure. Consequently, the Harry S. Truman administration pursued an aggressive campaign in Korea against the Soviet Union in order to safeguard its position as the leader of the free world. Conversely, Canada, which was preoccupied with its own sovereignty and content with a limited view of containment, had little interest in American objectives. Instead, Louis St. Laurent's government, influenced by past experiences with Great Power politics, sought to limit the excesses of the Truman administration in order to defend its autonomy. The consequence of this divergence forced officials in Ottawa and Washington to reconsider not only their national security strategies but also their relations with one another.
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/28694
http://dx.doi.org/10.20381/ruor-12675
CollectionTh├Ęses, 1910 - 2010 // Theses, 1910 - 2010
Files
MR73774.PDF8.84 MBAdobe PDFOpen